nginx error: client intended to send too large body

After moving this site to DigitalOcean‘s cloud environment, I found a problem when uploading a file from my blog posting interface. Looking up from the error log, it says "client intended to send too large body: 1122400 bytes". I wanted to upload a file larger than 1 MB. I’m using nginx for the web server, and the solution is pretty simple.

Edit /etc/nginx/nginx.conf configuration file, and add client_max_body_size 20M; between http { }. Save the config file and start the nginx. Problem solved. If you need higher value, just change the 20 MB to something higher.

vBulletin Performance Optimization

I have been dealing with vBulletin for almost a year now. I manage a vBulletin installation for my friend at Fashionese Daily forum. Anyway, Fashionese Daily forum have used other forum/discusion engines like punBB and MyBB. It’s now using vBulletin 3.7.3 Patch Level 1.
It’s a pretty busy-traffic forum anyway. In average, there are 1,000 new posts everyday. According to forum stats, there are 500 – 600 online users during the prime ours (registered and guests). From the very beginning, I try to maintain its performance so that the forum is available.
Based on many articles about vBulletin optimization, here are what I did:

How's your wp-config.php file?

WordPress relies on wp-config.php file to connect to database. Here, there are some basic settings about our WordPress installation like database-related information and language interface. When we upgrade our WordPress installation to new release, we can have our WordPress blog running without problem, even without touching wp-config.php file.
But, in some release, there are some new settings that should be — well, I’d rather say ‘recommended’ — added. For example, WordPress 2.5 introduced a new setting called SECRET_KEY. Read more about this new at Ryan Boren’s blog or WordPress Codex.
Do you have those setting in your wp-config.php? If not, it’s time to add it.
For the next release, there will be another new settings that can be added. So far, there will be WP_POST_REVISIONS. It’s related to Post Revisions feature that will be introduced in WordPress 2.6. Since I have taken the decision not to use that feature, I will turn this feature off for my coming upgrade. So, right now — I’m still using WordPress 2.5.1 — I added a setting to disable Post Revisions feature in my wp-config.php.
It’s always a good idea to have wp-config.php has the recommended settings, according to WordPress version we’re using. It’s never too late to fix your configuration file.