Bye LastPass, Hello Bitwarden

Photo by Anete Lusina from Pexels

After using Bitwarden for about a month, I could say that Bitwarden works for me and has a big chance to replace LastPass as my current password manager.

I have all the features I need. The initial migration to move all my LastPass data to Bitwarden was also easy. After that I did not save any new data to LastPass.

LastPass is a good product. It increases its subscription price time to time. In 2017 — when I subscribed to it — I needed to pay $12. A year later, the subscription fee was $24. And lastly in 2019, LastPass increased the subscription fee to $36/a year. The price is for the annual billing cycle. For monthly subscription, the price will be a little bit higher.

The price above actually almost in the same price range like what other password manager services. So, during the time period, it was more about choosing which service to be used. Thank you, Last Pass for making my digital life become easier in the last four years.

Deleting LastPass account

Now, it’s Bitwarden time. I started by using the basic free account. Yes, it’s a free account. It offers the core features for a good password manager. Basically, it should be enough for those who start to use password manager.

If I need more features, for a single-user account, its Premium Account is $10/year. It’s in a good price range, I think.

Password Manager: Let’s Give Bitwarden a Chance!

I have been using password manager since 2017 since I think there should be an easy, secure, and handy mechanism to deal with passwords. Of course, by using password manager, life is a little bit easier.

And, I chose LastPass. Last year, I still renewed my premium subscription for US$36 per year. LastPass works really well, but at the same time I am sure other password manager applications — like 1Password, DashLaneKeeper — share similar quality of features. But, it’s about choice.

Most “popular” password manager applications also offer similar subscription price, around US$36/year. My LastPass subscription will end next April, and I am thinking of moving to other application that does its basic jobs like storing password (of course!), generating good passwords, and managing credentials in categories/folders. Also, it should be also work on multiple devices and browsers.

After reading many articles, I decided to give Bitwarden a try. And, I read pretty much information about Bitwarden. One of the big differences with other password managers is that Bitwarden is open source. The other reason is on the pricing. It’s only US$10/year for personal use, or US$40/year for personal (family/organization).

My decision is not related to LastPass’ upcoming plan regarding the limitation for the free account since I was a paying customer since day one. According to a blog post:

We’re making changes to how Free users access LastPass across device types. LastPass offers access across two device types – computers (including all browsers running on desktops and laptops) or mobile devices (including mobile phones, smart watches, and tablets). Starting March 16th, 2021, LastPass Free will only include access on unlimited devices of one type

LastPass blog: Changes to LastPass Free

From the interface point of view, it’s not that beautiful — at least compared to LastPass. But hey, it’s about the features. As long as it works for me, I am fine with the interface.

About Bitwarden:

  1. Bitwarden official site
  2. Bitwarden on GitHub
  3. Bitwarden apps (desktop, mobile, including CLI)
  4. A detailed review about Bitwarden. CNET has some basic comparisons of multiple password managers.

Third year: LastPass

I started using LastPass for my password manager application in March 2017. So, this year, it’s my third year now. Before LastPass, I used 1Password. I didn’t remember the exact reasons why I switched to LassPass, but I think it was about the integration with applications in mobile devices.

I am satisfied with LassPass features. For some people, Google’s Password Manager will work. But, when it comes to more complex password and identity management, I think LassPass fits me more.

Is LassPass free? Unfortunately, not. I started my subscription for US $12/year (for Premium package). A year later, LassPass increased its pricing to US $24/year. And, this year, they increased the subscription pricing again to US $36/year.

Hat tip: LassPass was acquired by LogMeIn back in 2015.

LassPass offers competitive pricing compared to its competitor like DashLane (US $40/year), 1Password (US $36/year), and Keeper (US $30/year). Since LassPass works for me (until today), I think I will keep my subscription.