Google's AI Object Recognition Accuracy: 93%

How’s the accuracy of Google’s AI to identify objects in an image? According to the research report, it’s more than 93%. It’s 93.9% to be precise.

Today’s code release initializes the image encoder using the Inception V3 model, which achieves 93.9% accuracy on the ImageNet classification task. Initializing the image encoder with a better vision model gives the image captioning system a better ability to recognize different objects in the images, allowing it to generate more detailed and accurate descriptions. This gives an additional 2 points of improvement in the BLEU-4 metric over the system used in the captioning challenge.

Google Allo

I just had Google Allo — another messaging app by Google — installed on my Android phone. There are already some messaging installed and used on my daily basis. Well, basically, I only use Telegram (mostly) and WhatsApp. And now, Google Allo. I tried Google Assistant more inside Allo, and it works pretty well. I think the messaging feature will be something I will not be using.

Inbox by Gmail: Moving Spam email to Inbox

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I’ve been using Inbox by Gmail as my default web-based email to manage emails powered by Gmail. The “Snooze” and “Pin” are just helpful to keep me organised with my emails. Everything works, but there is a small things that — in my opinion — little bit inconvinient: dealing with Spam.

Gmail’s spam filter is great. But, sometime, I found that Google makes mistakes on the spam identification. Of course, it should be easy to bring back emails marked as spam to the inbox. Well, not while using Inbox by Gmail.

Viewing an email under the Spam folder will give the same experience. How to move email to inbox?

There is a menu to “Move to…”, but I could not see “Inbox” as one of the folder. The solution? Simple: Pin it.

Pinned email will go back to the inbox. It’s much simpler with the classic Gmail.

Moving to Google Apps for Work

Google Apps for Work

It’s been two for around two months since my small office moved the email service to Google Apps for Work. So far, it’s been a great experience and I think it was the right decision to make.

Why Moving?

Before moving to Google Apps for Work, we manage the email servers on our own. Meaning, we needed to do the setup, maintenance, including backup. There are less than twenty email accounts to manage under two main domains. The email was hosted on a cloud-based server — we used DigitalOcean. Everything was running almost without any issues.

We depend on emails on day-to-day operation. At the same time, we need to have (almost) zero maintenance and increase our productivity. Our small team needs to share lots of things like documents, spreadsheets, and agendas. The thing is that we need to use our personal Google account to share documents. The other things is on the storage. I have more than 6 GB of email (for work). So, moving to Google Apps for Work is an anticipation. Here are some main reasons on the migration:

  1. Zero maintenance. By outsourcing the email service to Google, we at least only need to keep the domain active.
  2. Integration with other Google services like Google Docs, Google Sheets, Google Calendar, and more. The integration also includes the seamless collaboratoin between coworkers.
  3. Flexible storage. By default, I have 30 GB of storage for my Gmail, Google Drive, and photos. If later I need to upgrade, the price is pretty reasonable. 100 GB for IDR 27,000 (per account) is a good deal.
  4. Simple setup and management. Setting up each service provided by Google Apps for Work is very easy.

Migration Process

The migration process was pretty easy. Since there were only around 12 email accounts, so moving them individually did not take too much time. My coworkers moved all the email account by themselves. The only challenge is not to have the downtime. There is a simple guide to work on this area. During the registration process, I only need to use a primary domain — and setup the secondary domain as domain alias later on.

For the cost efficiency, I worked on the settings on email routing. For example, if there is an email address that was only accessed by specific people in the organisation, I created some routing rules. By this, I can minimise the number of accounts.

After all emails (including attachments) had been migrated to Google Apps, we kept the “old” servers online for few days just to make sure that no data left behind. I was not sure how long the whole processes was completed, but it was around one week.

Snow: Snapchat’s copy

I’m on Snapchat. Yes, that Snapchat. Since it’s banned in South Korea, the users from South Korea should have an alternative. And, there is Snow. Snow shares similar features with Snapchat.
…it is also gaining traction in China, where the country’s 700 million users make up the world’s largest internet market. There, Snow has a major advantage: Snapchat is blocked in China.

It’s available for iOS and Android.

Android N is… Nougat

I think more people think that Android N will have Nutella as its new name. But, recently Android announced that the official name for Android N is Android Nougat.

Wait, Nougat? I personally not familar with this. According to Wikipedia:

Nougat is a family of confections made with sugar or honey, roasted nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios, hazelnuts, and macadamia nuts are common), whipped egg whites, and sometimes chopped candied fruit. The consistency of nougat is chewy, and it is used in a variety of candy bars and chocolates. The word nougat comes from Occitan pan nogat (pronounced [ˈpa nuˈɣat]), seemingly from Latin panis nucatus ‘nut bread’ (the late colloquial Latin adjective nucatum means ‘nutted’ or ‘nutty’).

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And, here’s a picture.

Image source: http://toetenzo.nl/?p=315

How do I Rate My Uber Trips (in Jakarta)?

When I visit Jakarta, I usually took Uber as for my ride. So far, I have good experiences with Uber, a company founded back in 2009. I have some basic considerations on taking Uber. First, it’s cashless. This is a good point for my convinient. The second one is that it has applications that works. Last but not least, it’s cheaper compared to the regular taxi. Even sometimes, during the busy hours, Uber has different price.

I like the way Uber keeps its service quality by its rating systems. In most of the time, I gave 4 or 5-star rating for the drivers. But, how do I rate my trip? I will give 5-star rating on these following conditions:

  1. The driver contacts me first to confirm that he wants to pick me up. If I have the notification on my phone that a driver pick my order, I usually wait for one or two minutes while watching his location. Even if it’s still 5-10 minutes, I don’t mind waiting.
  2. The driver greets me and make sure that we both ready to start the trip. “Good morning… Shall we start the ride?” is a simple and nice greeting.
  3. The driver does not ask me for direction. Even I have Google Maps on my phone and I can see the route — and I know how to get to my destination, I prefer to the driver to start the trip without asking for route. But, if since there are many route alternatives, I appreciate if the driver give me suggestion for example due to the traffic.
  4. After arriving on the destination, if the driver reminds me to check my belongings and says ‘thank you’, I really appreciate that.

Simple.